Who would like to buy a Knusperhäuschen for Christmas this year?

Ooooh, yummmmm….

My amazingly creative friend Colette (whom you may remember from this year’s Shavathon, and from several Fun Walks, around Claremont, around Bellville, and around Pinelands) of Cakes and Desserts is famous for the beautiful pastries, desserts and cakes she lovingly makes by hand. Some of them look so exquisite and delicate that you almost don’t want to bite into them… but when you do, the taste sensations that flood your entire being are out of this world.

In the run-up to Christmas, and in keeping with the German tradition (they also bake traditional Stollen and all my favourite German Weihnachtsgebäck), she has decided to create something magical that every child (and many an adult, I’m sure) will love: ginger bread houses.

Otherwise known as Knusperhäuschen.

A childhood dream come true: A magical Ginger Bread House

Now wouldn’t your kids or your grandchildren love something like this as a surprise Christmas gift?

Place your orders now, for one of these lovingly handmade creations at R200.00 each:

Contact details:

tel 021 789 2998
fax 021 789 2999

email info@cakesanddesserts.co.za

They are about 30cm high, 20cm wide, and 30 cm long, and take about four days to make on order.

And the entire house is edible – not just the colourful sweeties and cookies that are used as decorations.

8 thoughts on “Who would like to buy a Knusperhäuschen for Christmas this year?

    • They are cool, aren’t they, Slamdunk? When we get ours, I will post some pictures. We made one a couple of years ago, and BOY was it HARD! It was so difficult to get the Lebkuchen (Gingerbread) the same thickness, never mind sticking all the bits together… It looked lovely, but nowhere near as beautiful as this one. In the end, I gave it away to the local library, who raffled tickets for it to raise funds – and the family that won it was over the moon! 🙂

    • I think each stage probably needs some time to make and to ‘set’ – and if you make whole batches of dough and icing at the same time, you can work on several in parallel. More efficient than doing one at a time.

  1. I once had a friend whose German mother always sent him tins of German cookies at Christmas time : they were to DIE FOR. Wish I could indulge in a gingerbread (not even going to TRY that difficult German word) house, but alas, on the forbidden list …

    • German Weihnachtsgebaeck is absolutely to-die-for, Alison, I agree. For many, many years, my Gran always baked boxes and boxes of Lebkuchen, Mandelhörnchen, Honigkuchen, Spekulatius, Zimtsterne, Ruprechtkuchen, and hundreds of Plaetzchen with different toppings. She’d start making them in November, long before Christmas, because the Lebkuchen can be stored, and actually tastes nicer if it has been stored for a couple of weeks.

      When there was a sufficiently large ‘stash’, she’d make parcels for her children and their families, and then we’d go and deliver them all (at the time, the whole family was living in Swakopmund, so it was easy). She was THE BEST. I’ve got some of her recipes, and I have made those various things myself too, but it is a LOT of very hard work. Also, because you should use only the best and freshest ingredients (like the spices, the nuts, the honey and the butter), it adds up to cost an absolute fortune. Personally, I think you should never use margarine in Weihnachtsgebaeck, or in any ‘Gebaeck’ for that matter! You can get the special spice mixtures from the German delicatessen, like Raith in the Gardens Centre, but they are almost prohibitively expensive.

      Ah…. now you’ve made me run down memory lane, Alison… filled with longing for Oma’s Weihnachtsgebaeck. Sigh…

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