Wild flowers in the Cederberg

Here are some photos of the beautiful wild flowers that we saw on our trip to the Cederberg, where we spent a fabulous, relaxing weekend at the Jamaka Organic Farm.

I tried to look up the scientific names of the various flowers, but my reference book is not exhaustive enough, and trying to match up the images and descriptions on the internet with the photos I took, has proved a task too daunting for someone who is definitely not a botanist. And I don’t want to keep you waiting indefinitely until I buy a better reference book, so I figured I’d just upload the pictures in the meantime anyway.

Oh – and if you can help me with the names of these, I’d be deeply grateful.

Yellow daisy

Yellow daisy

Yellow daisy bush

Yellow daisy bush

Yellow blossom

Yellow blossom

Wild Cineraria

Wild Cineraria

Little white flowers

Little white flowers

Purple and yellow flowers

Purple and yellow flowers

Pink haze

Pink haze

Pink flowers on a long stem

Pink flowers on a long stem

Pink flowers amidst burnt shrubs

Pink flowers amidst burnt shrubs

Pale pink flowers

Pale pink flowers

Close-up of pale pink flowers

Close-up of pale pink flowers

Paired fleshy leaves on ground

Paired fleshy leaves on ground

Kalkoentjie (Gladiolus alatus)

Kalkoentjie (Gladiolus alatus)

Iris (Tritoniopsis antholyza)

Iris (Tritoniopsis antholyza)

Close-up of iris (Tritoniopsis antholyza)

Close-up of iris (Tritoniopsis antholyza)

Chincherinchee (Ornithogalum thyrsoides)

Chincherinchee (Ornithogalum thyrsoides)

Blue Sugarbush (Protea neriifolia) with beetle

Blue Sugarbush (Protea neriifolia) with beetle

Delicate blue flowers

Delicate blue flowers

Yellow flower

Yellow flower

Here are the links to my previous posts:

7 thoughts on “Wild flowers in the Cederberg

  1. True, went to check it, it’s originally from South Africa but the portuguese sailors brought it to the Madeira archipelago where it also grows (everything the portuguese explorers brought to Madeira seem to grow actually).

    http://br.olhares.com/flor_da_protea_madeira_foto1208098.html This is the same flower but open right?

    Also found this photos of flowers from Madeira if you’re interested 🙂
    http://ilhadamadeira.weblog.com.pt/arquivo/cat_flores_da_madeira.html

  2. Dear Reggie,

    I really loved the very scientific nomenclature iro classifications that you have used for the naming of the flowers in your pictures.

    Particularly,”Paired fleshy leaves on ground” and “Pink flowers on a long stem”… would make any Botanist proud!!

    Regards,

    Clarence

    • Thanks, Clarence. I bought myself the ‘Field Guide to Wild Flowers of South Africa’ by John Manning, because I was deeply troubled by my inability to identify the flowers I’ve been photographing. But, alas, said book has not made it any easier. In fact, it makes me feel even more ignorant than before. For instance, listen to this description of plants belonging to the Iris family (Iridaceae) – there are so many unfamiliar terms in this, that I shall have to consult an encyclopedia just to follow what is being said:

      “Rhizomatous, cormous or bulbous perennials, rarely shrubs. Leaves mostly sword-shaped and oriented edgewise to the stem in 2 ranks forming a fan, sometimes facing the stem and channelled, sometimes hairy. Inflorescence either a spike or the flowers enclosed in leafy bracts, usually on leafy sems, sometimes borne at ground level. Flowers variously coloured, often irregular, star-shaped, iris-like or funnel shaped to tubular, with 6 tepals that are separate or joined into a short to long tube; stamens 3, opposite the outer whorl of tepals, arising at the mouth of the tube when present, sometimes joined at the base into a column; ovary inferior, style slender and usually divided above, sometimes the branches petal-like. Widespread but most diverse in southern Africa +/- 1800 spp. Many species are grown in gardens, and Freesia, Gladiolus and Iris are widely grown for the cut-flower trade.”

      This is pretty detailed and exhaustive, and one would think that this would make it really easy to – at the very least – enable me to identify the FAMILY, if not the species of whatever flower I’ve just photographed.

      But: there are 72 (!) families of wild flowers listed in this book. Each with a similarly detailed description.

      I clearly have a LOT to learn about South African plants.

      Also, while I was leafing through the book, looking at the photographs and trying to compare it with the photos I’d taken, I realised that some flowers of entirely different species look almost the same, and that, unless I know what the stem or the leaves look like, or what the exact habitat of ‘my’ specimen was, it’s really difficult to identify it!

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